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T S Srinivasan Lecture on Neuro Diseases

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Expressbuzz.com
18 February 2011
Chennai, India

T S Srinivasan centre for clinical neuroscience and health policy has chosen heredity in neurological diseases as the theme for its 31st oration to be held on Saturday.

The TS Srinivasan oration on "Heredity as the cause of neurological diseases: the example of epilepsy" will be delivered by Simon Shorvon of University College, London. He is co–editor the journal Epilepsy and the author of more than 350 scientific papers. The oration will be followed by a congress bringing together 14 experts in epilepsy across the globe. The deliberations during the congress would be compiled into a book Epilepsy – A Global Approach.

Pointing out that a majority of the scientific literature in epilepsy has come from developed countries, Dr E S Krishnamoorthy said the congress would help to dispense expertise on epilepsy amongst Indian doctors. "We have 5 million in the country suffering from the disease (epilepsy), therefore we decided to chose it as the theme of the oration," he added.

Briefing media persons Simon said, "there have been tremendous advancements in our knowledge and understanding of epilepsy over the last three decades. The oration would trace the history of understanding the genetics of neurological disorders.

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Epilepsy Drugs Don't Harm IQ of Kids

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Epilepsy drugs don't harm IQ of breastfed babies (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)Epilepsy drugs don't harm IQ of breastfed babies (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)
Breastfeeding a baby while taking a seizure medication may have no harmful effect on the child’s IQ later in life, according to a new research from the Emory University School of Medicine.

"Our results showed no difference in IQ scores between the children who were breastfed and those who were not," said study author Kimford Meador.

"This is very good news for the many women who must take medication to avoid dangerous seizures and are worried about the possible risks of the drugs on their child if they breastfeed versus the many known benefits that come with breastfeeding their babies," added Meador.

Breastfeeding has been associated with decreased risks for heart disease, diabetes, and obesity in the child, and breast and ovarian cancer in the mother.

The study followed 194 pregnant women who were taking one epilepsy drug.

Of their 199 babies, 42 per cent were breastfed.

The children were given IQ tests at the age of three, and those who were breastfed scored an average of 99 on the test. Those who were not breastfed scored an average of 98, which according to Meador is not a significant difference. The mean IQ in the general population is 100.

The women were taking either carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin or valproate. The children whose mothers were taking valproate had lower IQ scores, regardless of whether or not they were breastfed.

"This is one of the first large scale studies related to epilepsy drugs and breast milk, but we know more research is needed on the effects of other drugs for epilepsy, especially some of the newer ones," said Meador.

Meador says AAN guidelines recommend that if possible women should avoid taking more than one epilepsy drug at a time during pregnancy since taking more than one drug has been found to increase the risk of birth defects compared to taking only one medication.

AAN guidelines also recommend that valproate be avoided during pregnancy due to risks of birth defects and effects on cognitive skills.

The study has been published in the November 24 online issue of Neurology , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Times of India
25 November 2010

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Bangalorean Represents India At Epilepsy Meet

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Times of India
19 November 2010
Bangalore, India

Laurels Down Under
Having successfully battled hot–water epilepsy and severe social stigma, K C Janardhan has come a long way in making a mark for himself. A well–known handwriting researcher, trainer, graphologist and calligrapher from Bangalore, Janardhan was chosen to represent India at the 8th Asian Oceanic Congress that was held in Melbourne, Australia, last month.

Janardhan was invited to speak on "Winning with Epilepsy and Calligraphy" in the Epilepsy and Society Programme, to motivate and inspire others to fight the illness and rid themselves of stigmas associated with it.

Janardhan’s presentation focused on the discovery of hot water epilepsy in the late 1960s and how doctors like K S Mani of Nimhans carried out the treatment, besides how epileptic patients are slowly being accepted by society.

Disclaimer: The news story on this page is the copyright of the cited publication. This has been reproduced here for visitors to review, comment on and discuss. This is in keeping with the principle of ‘Fair dealing’ or ‘Fair use’. Visitors may click on the publication name, in the news story, to visit the original article as it appears on the publication’s website.

Matrimonial Camp For Epilepsy Patients

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Sakaal Times
18 November 2010
Pune, India

Sanvedana Foundation – a city–based Epilepsy Support Group has organised a matrimonial camp exclusively for epilepsy patients, on November 21. There will also be experts’ lectures for patients and their patients.

Addressing media, founder director of ‘Sanvedana’ Yashoda Vakankar said, "Providing a platform for the epilepsy patients to share their experiences, the group was started in 2004. By the time, we come across the difficulties faced by epilepsy youngsters, while looking for life partner, Sanvedana started vivah.aarogya.com. It’s special online matrimonial bureau for people suffering from Epilepsy, Cancer, HIV, Disability and other special needs."

Sanvedana conducted its first matrimonial camp in 2008, which was responded hugely from the members across the country. The second camp has been organised on November 21 at G L Apte Hall, Apte Road, Deccan Gymkhana from 9 am to 2 pm.

‘Epilepsy marriage bureau’ is the brainchild of Sanvedana member Mohan Phatak. Phatak said, "Particularly for the girls and their parents is it difficult to manage marriage. Sometimes, marriages occur by cheating and hiding the diseases. We at Sanvedana try to clear their doubts and prejudices."

During the last matrimonial camp, eight couples were married, one of those couples is going to share experiences at the upcoming camp. Neurologist Dr Rahul Kulkarni, marriage counsellor Vandana Kulkarni and activist–writer Dr Anil Awachat would guide at the camp.

Disclaimer: The news story on this page is the copyright of the cited publication. This has been reproduced here for visitors to review, comment on and discuss. This is in keeping with the principle of ‘Fair dealing’ or ‘Fair use’. Visitors may click on the publication name, in the news story, to visit the original article as it appears on the publication’s website.

Fighting Stigma, He Wrote His Own Success

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The Hindu
17 November 2010
Bangalore, India

Mr. JanardhanMr. Janardhan
His story is an inspiration to those who suffer from epilepsy. A calligrapher of international repute, he was born with epilepsy and managed to battle all odds to live a full life.

Speaking to The Hindu, on the eve of National Epilepsy Day (November 17), K.C. Janardhan says that though born with the condition, he emerged a successful man. "Constant medication cured my condition. I want to tell my story to everyone who is affected with epilepsy. I want to tell them to not shy away but come out in the open and get themselves treated," says Mr. Janardhan, who is Executive Committee Member of the Indian Epilepsy Association, Bangalore Chapter. He implores people to fight the stigma that is often attached to this condition.

Mr. Janardhan, also a well known handwriting researcher, trainer, document examiner and graphologist, recently represented India at the eighth Asian Oceania Congress held recently in Melbourne. He spoke on ‘Winning with Epilepsy and Calligraphy' at the Epilepsy and Society Programme.

He was born with hot water epilepsy and was cured after he underwent medication for 20 long years. More than the condition, it was the social stigma he faced that made him a rebel and gave him the strength to fight prejudices.

"When I was diagnosed with it at the age of seven, I was asked to go to NIMHANS, which at that time was known as the Mental Hospital. I had to visit it every three months for regular checkups. My relatives termed me mad and shunned me." To cope, he channelised his pain to develop talents such as mimicry, sculpturing, storytelling, painting and public speaking. "This eventually drew their attention away from my condition."

Social stigma
"The strong social stigma associated with the condition prevents people even discussing it in public.
I'm trying to motivate people to get themselves treated and lead a normal life," Mr. Janardhan said.
"A good neurologist will help because 80 per cent of the time, the condition is curable."
He can be contacted on This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Disclaimer: The news story on this page is the copyright of the cited publication. This has been reproduced here for visitors to review, comment on and discuss. This is in keeping with the principle of ‘Fair dealing’ or ‘Fair use’. Visitors may click on the publication name, in the news story, to visit the original article as it appears on the publication’s website.

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